Roof Styles

3
Oct

Choosing the Best Roofing Material for Your House

What kind of roof do you want?

What kind of roof do you want?

There are so many kinds of roofing shingles on the market, choosing the best roofing material AND the one you really want one can become quite a task.

Just looking at the various types can make you dizzy.  For starters, homeowners should consider first and foremost which products are appropriate for their home in consideration of the style of the home, weather patterns, property owners association rules, deed restrictions, or a combination.  Doing so will narrow down the field substantially making the task easier, albeit with fewer choices.

Also, keep in mind that different materials have different life expectancies, too.

We recently spent time analyzing the pros and cons of metal roofs.  Further, slate and ceramic tile can seemingly last forever, but they’re extremely heavy, expensive, and not every home is suitable for them.  Asphalt and certain types of wood and treated wood products are the most popular since they not only last a while, but they are affordable in comparison with some other “lifetime” materials.  Even asphalt singles, which are the most common have life expectancies from as short as 7-10 years to 25-30 years.

Lastly, you’ll want to think about whether there is any kind of maintenance required to keep shingles in good condition, and if so, what it involves.  Buying a new roof should be thought out.  How long do you plan to stay in the home?  What kind of investment do you want to make?  Do you simply want to replace what you have with another cost affordable look alike?

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost.  
If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue. 

 

 

13
Sep

Is a metal roof right for you? – Part 1

Metal Roof

Metal roofs are tougher than asphalt shingles plus their heat reflective properties give homeowners the benefits of less energy use, reduced long term costs, and lower energy bills.

Often thought to be one of the more expensive roofing covers, metal roofing offers some price benefits that other forms of traditional roofing may not.

  1. The price of petroleum is escalating and inconsistent, making the cost of creating asphalt shingles higher and more unpredictable.
  2. In areas where damaging storms or heavy precipitation is common, insurance companies frequently offer deep discounts for having durable, metal roofing that can better stand up to flying debris such as falling limbs or even large hail.
  3. Resale values for metal roofs which last much longer than asphalt shingles (2x-3x longer), can increase the value of the property.

Want to know how much a metal roof will cost for your home?   e ……..

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost.  If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue. 

9
Sep

What type of roof is right for me?

What type of roof?

What type of roof do you want or what type is right for you?

Roof shingles have developed quite a bit through the years. There are several types available, and each has its own advantages. This article will outline a few of the most popular types of roof shingles.

Asphalt– Asphalt roof shingles are relatively inexpensive, and are one of the most common types of roofing shingles. They are thin and layered, with the top layer carrying the asphalt material. Although these roof shingles can wear out relatively quickly, if properly cared for, they will last about 20 years.

Wood– Wood roof shingles are more costly than asphalt, but prized for their natural appearance. They are made of hard wood, such as cedar, which can withstand strong sunlight and tolerate humidity quite well. Wood shingles can last for more than 30 years.

Tile– Tile roof shingles are unique in their Southwestern appeal. They are orange-ish in color and much heavier than either asphalt or wood roof shingles. They are among the most expensive roof shingles available, but they can last up to 80 years and are very durable, which means they are less likely to need repair than more common types of roof shingles.

Metal– Metal roofs are made different types of metal.  Over here we go into more depth about metal roofs

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost.  If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue. 

 

30
Aug

When Does an Asphalt Shingle Roof Need Replacement?

Roof-Replacement-in-process

Each roof’s condition is unique, and needs to be carefully looked at in order to determine whether replacement shingles are needed, or if an entirely new roof is needed.

Typically, an asphalt shingle roof will last roughly 20 years unless it was installed improperly, or a severe hail or wind storm damaged the shingles. Each roofing system is unique and should be looked at by a professional.

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost.  If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue. 

21
Aug

Is Your Roof At Risk During a Hurricane?

gabled-roof

Hurricane season is here, so make sure you take the time to evaluate your home’s roof structure! Roofs come in many different styles and types, which results in some being more durable than others during a hurricane. Gabled roofs, structured with triangular shape profiles, are thought to be the weakest type of roof when faced with the extreme winds brought on by a hurricane. This is due to the fact that the gables are not typically reinforced enough to hold up to high winds, unless they are built correctly with proper wind code protection for that specific area. Of course, there are other types of roofs that can also be structurally unsound when being put up against high pounding winds.

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost.  If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue. 

 

8
Aug

What is up with radiant barriers anyway?

radiant-barrier-in-new-construction

How do radiant barriers work? It is a little deep scientifically, but this is a good explanation from the U.S. Department of Energy.
Radiant barriers are installed in homes – usually in attics – primarily to reduce summer heat gain, which helps lower cooling costs. The barriers consist of a highly reflective material that reflects (or more specifically, re-emits) radiant heat rather than absorbing it. They don’t, however, reduce heat conduction like thermal insulation materials.
The Radiant Barrier Structure
Heat travels from a warm area to a cool area by a combination of conduction, convection, and radiation. Heat flows by conduction from a hotter location within a material or assembly to a colder location. Heat transfer by convection occurs when a liquid or gas is heated by a surface, becomes less dense, and rises (natural convection), or when a moving stream of air absorbs heat from a warmer surface (forced convection). Radiant heat travels in a straight line away from any surface and heats anything solid that absorbs the incident energy. Radiant heat transfer occurs because warmer surfaces emit more radiation than cooler surfaces. When the sun heats a roof, it’s primarily the sun’s radiant energy that makes the roof hot. A large portion of this heat travels by conduction through the roofing materials to the attic side of the roof. The hot roof material then radiates its gained heat energy onto the cooler attic surfaces, including the air ducts and the attic floor. A radiant barrier reduces the radiant heat transfer from the underside of the roof to the other surfaces in the attic.
Are they cost effective?
According to the Department of Energy homes in the southern United States can save $150 or more a year in utility bills by using a radiant barrier. This makes it a good weapon against high energy bills, but probably a secondary weapon. The primary weapon is to ensure attic insulation is properly installed to a R30 to R38 rating. The next best weapon to make sure the attic is properly ventilated.
Still confused or want more information? Call or email us at RoofBidders.com We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost. If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.