30
Apr

Why You Need To Vent! Roof vent that is…

GAF Air Flow Example

Does your roof vent enough?

Lately we have noticed more and more roofing companies trying to woo customers with the latest uber-vent.  Is this a new fad?  Does every house need a roof vent?

The simple fact is that while each of us need to vent every now and then, roofs need to vent all the time.

Why do roofs need to vent?

The simplest answer is to let the air out of your attic.  Whether it’s warm or cold air, attic vents (and ventilation in general) help the roof last longer and can prevent many serious and expensive issues from popping up later as the moisture and stagnant air will begin eating away at the roof system.

As Spring is here and Summer is near, let’s focus on hot air.

Ventilation helps to exhaust hot, moist air as it rises within the attic.  It can escape naturally, via the ridges on top of the roof (ridge vents), OR it can be forced out via powered exhaust vents; also known as roof vents (or attic vents).

Hot air, especially if it is moist, will soon cause a whole host of issues if it is not properly vented.  But just adding a roof vent will not solve this problem.   For the hot air to escape, fresh air must be able to flow INTO the attic.

TIP: Do not buy roof vents without knowing if your roof has adequate inflow capabilities.   Below is an illustration of how air moves (or does not) based upon ventilation.

attic roof airflow

What happens to a roof without roof vents or proper ventilation?

First, excessive heating or cooling bills are a certainty.  Additionally, poor ventilation creates excess moisture which will eventually cause metallic materials, including nails, to rust and break.

Further, the roof decking itself will begin to deteriorate from rot and various types of fungi.

Finally, mold will develop and wreck havoc everywhere it grows.

How do you ensure the attic and roof system has proper ventilation?

The best way to is to make sure there is adequate air ventilation and movement at each ventilation point.  Roof vents alone are not the answer.

Proper attic ventilation will be balanced between inflows and outflows.  This requires using ridge vents as well as exhaust vents (roof vents) along with intake vents at the eave, soffit, or fascia area of the roof.

Most experts agree, you need 1 square foot of ventilation for every 150 square feet of attic space; 50% should be intake and 50% exhaust.

Still have questions, the experienced roofers within the RoofBidders’ network understand what it takes to properly install  adequate ventilation for your home.



Want more information?  Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us. 

No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

22
Dec

Algae on the Roof, yuck!

Algae on the roof Moss-on-Roof-Shingles-Removal-with-green-mold

Do you have algae on the roof?

There are two main types of algae, “black algae” and “green algae”.  The green stuff is really more of a moss.  Both of these types are seen most commonly in humid climates.  Whether you have black or green algae on the roof they are both undesirable.

Algae or moss can do more than make your roof an ugly sight – it can damage the roof.

Black algae looks like black streaks running down the shingle roof.  The good news is it does not damage the shingle.  While black shingles are cosmetically unsightly, with proper cleaning the shingles’ appearance can be restored. Green algae or any kind of moss, however, can grow into the shingle and cause damage. Think of it this way, one is just dirty streaks and the other is a living organism.  Fortunately, both types can be cleaned off by a roofer or even by a do-it-yourself homeowner.

Can you avoid algae on the roof?

One way to avoid moss or algae growing is to install an an algae resistant shingle.  CertainTeed manufacturers shingles with “StreakFighter” which comes in 10 and 15 year durations.  Why not 20 or 30 years?  The reason is that the copper coating on the granules wears off over time even before the shingle wears out. The copper coating is what resists the algae growth.

 

Confused or want more information? Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us. No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, Facebook, or Twitter, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.

 

8
Nov

Roof mold – Is it dangerous?

Black "roof mold" on shingles

Black “roof mold” on shingles

Roof Mold.  What is it and is it dangerous?

Is it algae, moss, lichens, fungi, or possible deadly black mold?   We have all heard about deadly black mold growing in homes.  But rest assured, that roof mold is not that rare deadly black mold.

But on houses receiving the right conditions of shade and moisture/humidity, growth of things like algae, moss, or fungi will grow.  In areas with high humidity or frequent rainfall, ensure that your roof is exposed to as much sunlight as possible.

Roof mold or other growths may be merely unsightly; but in more severe cases, can begin destroying shingles.

With algae and some fungal growth, the extent of the damage may only be shingle discoloration.  In warm, humid conditions, certain airborne algae can grow on shingles, leaving “roof mold” that is black or dark-green stains.

Moss or lichens growing on a roof are more likely to hold moisture against the shingles, which can accelerate damage.  Furthermore, if left untreated, their roots or growth structures will eventually penetrate and shorten the life of roof shingles.

Another likely source of damage is the cleaning methods used to combat roof mold or algal growth.

Pressure washing and harsh chemicals can cause rapid granule loss or other shingle degradation.   As is the case with algal treatment, the removal methods for roof mold may cause more damage than the growth itself.  But that does not mean you just leave the growth.  Take preventative measures to combat these growths since roof mold can be destructive.

Tree damage is also a leading cause of of the discoloration attributed to roof mold.

Roof damage from tree branches are a major contributor to needed roof repair or replacement.  Branches that rub against the roof cause granule loss and in some cases cut through the shingles or pull them out of place.  This loss of granule will change the color of the shingles as they are removed.

Unsightly “roof mold” may be the least of your concerns if branches are not trimmed when they come in contact with the roof.  During a storm, heavy winds may cause branches to break off and land on your roof causing major damage to the shingles and decking.

Trim away any overhanging tree branches and maintain your gutters and downspouts so that rainfall will drain quickly.

Confused or want more information?

Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us.  No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, Facebook, or Twitter, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.

31
Oct

Will a new roof save energy and lower my utility bill?

Will a new roof save energy

High Energy Costs?

High energy bills?  Asking yourself will a new roof save energy?

The short answer is… Yes, a new roof almost always saves energy.   Older attics and roof are likely to be outdated in a variety of ways.

Why will a new roof save energy?

Excessive energy costs come from many different places in a home.  Previously, we mentioned how the roof is similar to a body’s skin.  One the skin breaks, the body is susceptible to infection. Any exterior component of a home such as windows, doors, or a roof all are potential energy loss points.

Consider why you are asking yourself the question of will a new roof save energy.  Why ask this question?  Because just putting a new roof on your home may save energy; but it might not save enough energy to make up for the cost of the roof – unless you look at a a long timeline such as 5-10 years.

What are some of the ways a roof will save energy?

First, determine where you can save money by determine where you are losing energy.  Is it the attic itself?  Is it a break down in the roof?  Is there adequate insulation?  Is there adequate ventilation? An issue as simple such as insufficient attic ventilation will cause heating/cooling systems to run excessively.  If the cold air or hot air  pumping into a home from these types of systems escaping as fast as it is coming in?

In warm weather, inadequate ventilation will trap hot air in the attic, causing air conditioning systems to work harder, or leaving your home’s interior hotter and less comfortable.  Additionally, in both hot and cold weather, insufficient attic ventilation may cause moisture in the attic to become trapped and condense on the rafters. This condensed moisture can drip down onto the insulation and reduce its effectiveness.

Will a new roof save energy if the insulation situation is poor?  Not much it won’t.  Without a doubt better insulation and ventilation will reduce energy usage.  So, first consider your current attic insulation and ventilation.  You can get a good idea about what insulation rating is right for your area by checking out the Energy Star government website.

Confused or want more information? Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us.  No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, Facebook, or Twitter, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.

24
Oct

How do I know when to replace my roof? Danger signs for a roof. – part two

Roof problems that help answer the question, “How do I know when to replace my roof?” part two

Last week we pointed out that the guys over at GAF, who manufacture roofing materials, posted a really good set of photos to help you determine if you have red flags that need to be carefully examined.   They call them Key Danger Signals of a Failing Roof?

Let’s look at the other danger signs that likely point to a roof replacement need.  But remember that not every type of roof damage means you have to replace your roof.  You might be able to patch it and then prepare and plan to have it replaced in the near future.

But be on the lookout for the issues below to help answer the question, “How do I know when to replace my roof?”

Stains on Interior Ceilings and Walls or Mold and Mildew Growth

Possible cause: Leaking water supply or drain line OR inadequate, faulty shingle underlayment which allows leakage.  Mold could also be caused by inadequate ventilation which traps moisture.

 

Stains leading to roof replacement

Stains indicating water penetration

Exterior Decay, Sheathing, and/or Siding

Possible cause: Poor attic ventilation.  If the exterior of your home looks like this picture you have a real problem.  Does this answer the question, “when to replace my roof?”  Not yet.  But you need to figure out what is causing this problem. You might have a leak which is slowly eating away at your sheathing or siding.

 

exterior damage indicating roof replacement need

Siding damage

Missing, Cracked, or Curled Shingles

Possible cause: Shingles have reached the end of their useful life OR a major storm tore up the roof.  Sometimes your shingles have just reached their end of life and you need to replace the roof.  If you have 20 year shingles, have had your roof on for 25 years, and it looks like this photo you can answer the question, “How do I know when to replace my roof?” in by nodding your head repeating after me, “Yes.  I need a roof replacement.”

 


singles destroyed indicating roof replacement  need

Major damage to shingles

 

Dark, “dirty-looking” areas

Possible cause: Loss of granules due to age of shingles.  This one is tough.  Your singles might have simple been worn down over time or you might have mold growing on your roof.  It is important to take a closer look.  Do not jump to roof replacement mode just because you have a few worn shingles.  In this photo, the granules have definitely been worn away.  This is a warning sign that a roof replacement is in your future.  But does this answer the question “when to replace my roof?”  Not exactly but it is a warning sign.  At some point these shingles will fail but you still might have a few years if the rest of the roof is in fair shape.

shingles  missing granules indicating time to replace roof

Shingles with missing granules

Confused or want more information? Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us.  No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, Facebook, or Twitter, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.