17
Apr

Architectural Shingles or 3-Tab Shingles

Architectural Shingles or 3-Tab Shingles is a question most new roof buyers ask themselves.

But what are Architectural Shingles?  Should you get them for your roof even if you had 3-Tab before?

First, architectural shingles are asphalt shingles just like 3-Tab.  Most of us know what an asphalt shingle looks like, whether we know it or not.  Just look at your roof and more than not you have asphalt shingles; unless you have a specialty roof such as tile or metal.  Second, an asphalt shingle is one of the most widely used roofing covers in North America because most varieties are affordable and straightforward to install. 

Main types of asphalt shingles

The first type of commonly used asphalt single is the “3-Tab”.
Architectural Shingles or 3-Tab Shingles. This is 3-Tab

3-Tab Shingles

As you can see, it is a very straight forward simple shingle.  It is called a 3-Tab because it comes in 3tab sections.  This types of asphalt single is more commonly found on lower value properties but is still very popular.

Why is 3-Tab found more frequently on lower valued properties?

3-Tab is inexpensive compared to most types of roofs and can be installed very quickly.  But all asphalt shingles will protect your home so choosing between the various types is as much about the look and feel as it is the protection and price.   3-Tab shingles used to be the “Go To” shingle but over the last several years architectural shingles have quickly gained traction and are now the “Go To” shingle for most roofers and homeowners.

Architectural or 3-Tab?  Look, warranty, and price are the key drivers for most homeowners.   3-Tab also comes in many colors and has acceptable warranties for most people.

The second most common type of asphalt shingle is the architectural or “dimensional” shingle.
Architectural Shingles or 3-Tab Shingles. This is Architectural

Architectural Shingles

These shingles have more character and customization options than 3-Tab.  As you can see, this type of shingle has dimensions to it and more of a 3-D “custom” look.   These types of shingles are heavier than 3-Tab and have better warranties in many cases.  Also, more and more Property Owner Associations are demanding that roof replacement use architectural style shingles; unless you live in a neighborhood with tile roofs.

Comparison: Architectural or 3-Tab

Both types of these shingles can last for many years but the architectural shingles are thicker and come with a larger variety of warranties. Rarely do you see an architectural or “dimensional” shingle with less than a 20 year warranty.  In fact, some even come with what is being styled a “Lifetime Warranty”.

At the end of the day an architectural shingle is still an asphalt shingle but it looks better, performs better, lasts longer, is heavier, and usually has a much longer warranty.    Just look at these compared side-by-side and you can see that an architectural shingle is more attractive than a 3-Tab.

Architectural or 3-Tab Singles Comparing

Compare the differences.

 


Confused or want more information? Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us.  No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, Facebook, or Twitter, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.

 

14
Jan

Common Roof Problems in the Winter – part 1

Common Roof Problems with snow and man

Man on roof with snow shovel

What are some of the most common roof problems in the winter? – Part 1

Most people immediately think about ice dams.  But there are other issues which can be quite common.

Falling.  Serious fall injuries and even death occurs as people climb on their roof and attempt to clear the snow off.   Secondary damage can be caused by people chopping or hitting their roof to try to get rid of ice.  While the ice might break free, there is a real chance that the shingles or gutters will take damage.  Frequent hacking at the roof or yanking ice off the gutters can lead to water penetration into the roof where the gutters pull away.

Blocked Vents.  Snow-blocked plumbing vents will create drainage problems and even sewer gas backups into the home.  Sewer gas is not only smelly and unsanitary but an explosion risk.  Make sure all vents are tall enough to stay out of the snow.

Cracked or Broken Shingles.  Even when someone does not fall off the roof, when they climb around on frozen shingles they can snap “like a pine needle in the wintertime”.  Walking on older roofs when it is cold or they are frozen almost assures damage.

Snow. Plain and simple, it gets heavy and gets heavy fast!   Accumulated snow, particularly in the early spring when heavy snow coverings absorb rain can quickly become very heavy and cause major damage.  A roof’s core components such as rafters or trusses can break under the strain.  Newer homes with “up to date” or code conforming structures are less likely to break under the weight of snow; but older homes or those where the builder or roofer took shortcuts can easily crack under the strain.

Next up part 2 of Common Roof Problems in the the Winter….


Confused or want more information? Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us.  No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, Facebook, or Twitter, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.

 

22
Dec

Algae on the Roof, yuck!

Algae on the roof Moss-on-Roof-Shingles-Removal-with-green-mold

Do you have algae on the roof?

There are two main types of algae, “black algae” and “green algae”.  The green stuff is really more of a moss.  Both of these types are seen most commonly in humid climates.  Whether you have black or green algae on the roof they are both undesirable.

Algae or moss can do more than make your roof an ugly sight – it can damage the roof.

Black algae looks like black streaks running down the shingle roof.  The good news is it does not damage the shingle.  While black shingles are cosmetically unsightly, with proper cleaning the shingles’ appearance can be restored. Green algae or any kind of moss, however, can grow into the shingle and cause damage. Think of it this way, one is just dirty streaks and the other is a living organism.  Fortunately, both types can be cleaned off by a roofer or even by a do-it-yourself homeowner.

Can you avoid algae on the roof?

One way to avoid moss or algae growing is to install an an algae resistant shingle.  CertainTeed manufacturers shingles with “StreakFighter” which comes in 10 and 15 year durations.  Why not 20 or 30 years?  The reason is that the copper coating on the granules wears off over time even before the shingle wears out. The copper coating is what resists the algae growth.

 

Confused or want more information? Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us. No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, Facebook, or Twitter, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.

 

8
Nov

Roof mold – Is it dangerous?

Black "roof mold" on shingles

Black “roof mold” on shingles

Roof Mold.  What is it and is it dangerous?

Is it algae, moss, lichens, fungi, or possible deadly black mold?   We have all heard about deadly black mold growing in homes.  But rest assured, that roof mold is not that rare deadly black mold.

But on houses receiving the right conditions of shade and moisture/humidity, growth of things like algae, moss, or fungi will grow.  In areas with high humidity or frequent rainfall, ensure that your roof is exposed to as much sunlight as possible.

Roof mold or other growths may be merely unsightly; but in more severe cases, can begin destroying shingles.

With algae and some fungal growth, the extent of the damage may only be shingle discoloration.  In warm, humid conditions, certain airborne algae can grow on shingles, leaving “roof mold” that is black or dark-green stains.

Moss or lichens growing on a roof are more likely to hold moisture against the shingles, which can accelerate damage.  Furthermore, if left untreated, their roots or growth structures will eventually penetrate and shorten the life of roof shingles.

Another likely source of damage is the cleaning methods used to combat roof mold or algal growth.

Pressure washing and harsh chemicals can cause rapid granule loss or other shingle degradation.   As is the case with algal treatment, the removal methods for roof mold may cause more damage than the growth itself.  But that does not mean you just leave the growth.  Take preventative measures to combat these growths since roof mold can be destructive.

Tree damage is also a leading cause of of the discoloration attributed to roof mold.

Roof damage from tree branches are a major contributor to needed roof repair or replacement.  Branches that rub against the roof cause granule loss and in some cases cut through the shingles or pull them out of place.  This loss of granule will change the color of the shingles as they are removed.

Unsightly “roof mold” may be the least of your concerns if branches are not trimmed when they come in contact with the roof.  During a storm, heavy winds may cause branches to break off and land on your roof causing major damage to the shingles and decking.

Trim away any overhanging tree branches and maintain your gutters and downspouts so that rainfall will drain quickly.

Confused or want more information?

Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us.  No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, Facebook, or Twitter, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.

24
Oct

How do I know when to replace my roof? Danger signs for a roof. – part two

Roof problems that help answer the question, “How do I know when to replace my roof?” part two

Last week we pointed out that the guys over at GAF, who manufacture roofing materials, posted a really good set of photos to help you determine if you have red flags that need to be carefully examined.   They call them Key Danger Signals of a Failing Roof?

Let’s look at the other danger signs that likely point to a roof replacement need.  But remember that not every type of roof damage means you have to replace your roof.  You might be able to patch it and then prepare and plan to have it replaced in the near future.

But be on the lookout for the issues below to help answer the question, “How do I know when to replace my roof?”

Stains on Interior Ceilings and Walls or Mold and Mildew Growth

Possible cause: Leaking water supply or drain line OR inadequate, faulty shingle underlayment which allows leakage.  Mold could also be caused by inadequate ventilation which traps moisture.

 

Stains leading to roof replacement

Stains indicating water penetration

Exterior Decay, Sheathing, and/or Siding

Possible cause: Poor attic ventilation.  If the exterior of your home looks like this picture you have a real problem.  Does this answer the question, “when to replace my roof?”  Not yet.  But you need to figure out what is causing this problem. You might have a leak which is slowly eating away at your sheathing or siding.

 

exterior damage indicating roof replacement need

Siding damage

Missing, Cracked, or Curled Shingles

Possible cause: Shingles have reached the end of their useful life OR a major storm tore up the roof.  Sometimes your shingles have just reached their end of life and you need to replace the roof.  If you have 20 year shingles, have had your roof on for 25 years, and it looks like this photo you can answer the question, “How do I know when to replace my roof?” in by nodding your head repeating after me, “Yes.  I need a roof replacement.”

 


singles destroyed indicating roof replacement  need

Major damage to shingles

 

Dark, “dirty-looking” areas

Possible cause: Loss of granules due to age of shingles.  This one is tough.  Your singles might have simple been worn down over time or you might have mold growing on your roof.  It is important to take a closer look.  Do not jump to roof replacement mode just because you have a few worn shingles.  In this photo, the granules have definitely been worn away.  This is a warning sign that a roof replacement is in your future.  But does this answer the question “when to replace my roof?”  Not exactly but it is a warning sign.  At some point these shingles will fail but you still might have a few years if the rest of the roof is in fair shape.

shingles  missing granules indicating time to replace roof

Shingles with missing granules

Confused or want more information? Trying to understand the costs associated with replacing a roof?  Call, email, post to Facebook, or tweet to us.  No Fee, No Obligation, Just help for you.

Don’t want to talk to anyone and just want a quick, satellite photograph measurement to help estimate the cost for your roof?  Order the Quick Report

If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, Facebook, or Twitter, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.

8
Oct

Roof Warranty. What are the Costs?

No one beats my roof warranty.

Roof warranty! Mine costs less!

Roof warranty covered your issue?  Really?

Roofing materials have one warranty lifespan and the roofing contractor has a second and separate warranty.

Along with overall shingle lifespan, homeowners should understand that the roofer’s warranty, usually called workmanship, and the shingle warranty (or what most call the roof warranty) are two separate affairs, which may or may not overlap.  Fixing something after the warranty has expired will cost you money!  Understand the limits.

In regard to the roofing shingles themselves, understanding what is actually being warranted, who covers it, and what things can void a shingle warranty is all important.  Discussing roof warranty  details with your roofer so that everyone is on the same page is helpful, and reduces the chance of surprises should there be an issue that puts the warranty into play.

When comparing roofing contractor bids it is important to consider how long you plan to live in the home and the warranties provided.

Going to leave within the next few years?  Maybe you don’t want to buy a 30 years roof warranty shingle.  Maybe a excellent 10 year shingle will work fine.

With all of this food for thought, it’s probably easy to see how there is a lot more involved in deciding on the best roof shingle to use on your next roofing job.  Spending a little time researching the various options will pay off in the long run with a quality, durable roof that will last for years without a problem.

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners.  Don’t want to talk to anyone and just get a quick quote?  Order the Quick Report.

We will talk with you at no cost.  If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.

 

3
Oct

Choosing the Best Roofing Material for Your House

What kind of roof do you want?

What kind of roof do you want?

There are so many kinds of roofing shingles on the market, choosing the best roofing material AND the one you really want one can become quite a task.

Just looking at the various types can make you dizzy.  For starters, homeowners should consider first and foremost which products are appropriate for their home in consideration of the style of the home, weather patterns, property owners association rules, deed restrictions, or a combination.  Doing so will narrow down the field substantially making the task easier, albeit with fewer choices.

Also, keep in mind that different materials have different life expectancies, too.

We recently spent time analyzing the pros and cons of metal roofs.  Further, slate and ceramic tile can seemingly last forever, but they’re extremely heavy, expensive, and not every home is suitable for them.  Asphalt and certain types of wood and treated wood products are the most popular since they not only last a while, but they are affordable in comparison with some other “lifetime” materials.  Even asphalt singles, which are the most common have life expectancies from as short as 7-10 years to 25-30 years.

Lastly, you’ll want to think about whether there is any kind of maintenance required to keep shingles in good condition, and if so, what it involves.  Buying a new roof should be thought out.  How long do you plan to stay in the home?  What kind of investment do you want to make?  Do you simply want to replace what you have with another cost affordable look alike?

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost.  
If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue. 

 

 

9
Sep

What type of roof is right for me?

What type of roof?

What type of roof do you want or what type is right for you?

Roof shingles have developed quite a bit through the years. There are several types available, and each has its own advantages. This article will outline a few of the most popular types of roof shingles.

Asphalt– Asphalt roof shingles are relatively inexpensive, and are one of the most common types of roofing shingles. They are thin and layered, with the top layer carrying the asphalt material. Although these roof shingles can wear out relatively quickly, if properly cared for, they will last about 20 years.

Wood– Wood roof shingles are more costly than asphalt, but prized for their natural appearance. They are made of hard wood, such as cedar, which can withstand strong sunlight and tolerate humidity quite well. Wood shingles can last for more than 30 years.

Tile– Tile roof shingles are unique in their Southwestern appeal. They are orange-ish in color and much heavier than either asphalt or wood roof shingles. They are among the most expensive roof shingles available, but they can last up to 80 years and are very durable, which means they are less likely to need repair than more common types of roof shingles.

Metal– Metal roofs are made different types of metal.  Over here we go into more depth about metal roofs

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost.  If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue. 

 

4
Sep

Signs you may need a new Roof

Old Roof

No matter how diligently a homeowner pays attention to their house roof, there will come a time when the roof simply cannot be repaired and instead must be replaced. But how does a homeowner know when to make such a seemingly drastic call about their house roof? Not to worry; there are several telltale signs that the time for a brand new roof has come at last.

Curled and cracked shingles – If your house roof is made of asphalt shingles and it’s been more than 15 years since the roof was replaced, the general rule of thumb advises that you lean towards getting it replaced. By this time, the roof may be showing serious signs of wear. A house roof whose majority of shingles are curled and cracking is one that probably needs replacing.

Stains –  If there are stains on the outer walls of the house, on the rafters, or on the decking underneath the roof’s shingles, that is a major red flag. Staining around the areas of a house roof can be an indication of problems such as wood rot, a buildup of excessive moisture, or a combination of both. These problems tend to be more common in areas that face seasonal storms and humidity, so your house roof can therefore be vulnerable to these elements and eventually need to be replaced.

Excessive sagging – Poor workmanship or an inadequately ventilated roof can lead to a sagging roof. If the house roof is noticeably sagging, and especially if it has been that way for some time, the house is likely to need a replacement roof.

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost.  If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue. 

30
Aug

When Does an Asphalt Shingle Roof Need Replacement?

Roof-Replacement-in-process

Each roof’s condition is unique, and needs to be carefully looked at in order to determine whether replacement shingles are needed, or if an entirely new roof is needed.

Typically, an asphalt shingle roof will last roughly 20 years unless it was installed improperly, or a severe hail or wind storm damaged the shingles. Each roofing system is unique and should be looked at by a professional.

Still confused or want more information?   Call or email us at RoofBidders.com    We love to provide FREE education to property owners. We will talk with you at no cost.  If you have a specific roof issue and can send us a photo via email, we will do our best to advise you on the specific issue.